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Category Archives: Hip Hop Health

Hip-Hop Health- Hill Harper (Thyroid Cancer)

Cancer survivor Hill Harper is having to watch what he eats and exercise religiously after his thyroid was removed in surgery. The author and actor has been given the all-clear after undergoing surgery to remove his cancerous thyroid – but now he faces a constant battle to stay in shape.

Hip-Hop Health- Missy Elliot (Graves Disease)

Graves disease is an immune system disorder that results in the overproduction of thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism). While a num

Because thyroid hormones affect a number of different body systems, signs and symptoms associated with Graves’ disease can be wide ranging and significantly influence your overall well-being.ber of disorders may result in hyperthyroidism, Graves’ disease is the most common cause.

Graves’ disease is rarely life-threatening. Although it may affect anyone, Graves’ disease is more common among women and before the age of 40.

The primary treatment goals are to inhibit production of thyroid hormones and lessen the severity of symptoms.

CAUSES- Graves’ disease is caused by a dysfunction in the body’s disease-fighting immune system.

One normal immune system response is the production of antibodies designed to target a specific virus, bacterium or other foreign substance. In Graves’ disease — for reasons that aren’t well understood — the body produces an antibody to a particular protein on the surface of cells in the thyroid, a hormone-producing gland in the neck.

Normally, thyroid function is regulated by a hormone released by a tiny gland at the base of the brain (pituitary gland). The antibody associated with Graves’ disease — thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) — can essentially mimic the action of the regulatory pituitary hormone. Therefore, TRAb overrides normal regulation of the thyroid and results in overproduction of thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism).

Result of hyperthyroidism
Thyroid hormones affect a number of body functions, including:

  • Metabolism, the processing of nutrients to create energy for cells
  • Heart and nervous system function
  • Body temperature
  • Muscle strength
  • Menstrual cycle

Consequently, the impact of Graves’ disease may be widespread and result in a decline in the overall quality of life.

Cause of Graves’ ophthalmopathy
The exact cause of Graves’ ophthalmopathy is also not well understood. However, it appears that the same antibody that can cause thyroid dysfunction may also have an “attraction” to tissues surrounding the eyes. The antibody activity triggers inflammation and other immune system events that result in the signs and symptoms of Graves’ ophthalmopathy.

Graves’ ophthalmopathy often appears at the same time as hyperthyroidism or several months later. But signs and symptoms of ophthalmopathy may appear years before or after the onset of hyperthyroidism. Graves’ ophthalmopathy may also appear in the absence of hyperthyroidism.

Common signs and symptoms of Graves’ disease include:

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • A rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • A fine tremor of your hands or fingers
  • An increase in perspiration or warm, moist skin
  • Sensitivity to heat
  • Weight loss, despite normal eating habits
  • Enlargement of your thyroid gland (goiter)
  • Change in menstrual cycles
  • Erectile dysfunction or reduced libido
  • Frequent bowel movements or diarrhea
  • Bulging eyes (Graves’ ophthalmopathy)
  • Thick, red skin usually on the shins or tops of the feet (Graves’ dermopathy)

Graves’ ophthalmopathy
About half the people with Graves’ disease show some signs and symptoms of a condition known as Graves’ ophthalmopathy. In Graves’ ophthalmopathy, inflammation and other immune system events affect muscles and other tissues around your eyes. The resulting signs and symptoms may include:

  • Bulging eyes
  • Excess tearing
  • Dry, irritated eyes
  • Gritty sensation in the eyes
  • Pressure or pain in the eyes
  • Puffy eyelids
  • Reddened or inflamed eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • Double vision
  • Limited eye movements, resulting in a fixed stare
  • Blurred or reduced vision (rare)
  • Ulcers on the cornea (rare)

Graves’ dermopathy
An uncommon manifestation of Graves’ disease, called Graves’ dermopathy, is the reddening and thickening of the skin, most often on your shins or the top of your feet.

When to see a doctor
A number of medical conditions can cause the signs and symptoms associated with Graves’ disease. See your doctor if you experience any potential Graves-related problems to get a prompt and accurate diagnosis.

Seek emergency care if you’re experiencing heart-related signs and symptoms, such as a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

Hip-Hop Health- Lil Wayne (Epilepsy)

Lil Wayne has opened up about his recent health drama, revealing he has epilepsy and regularly suffers life-threatening seizures, which fans never hear about.

Hip-Hop Health- Big Tigger (HIV/AIDS Advocate)

 A strong advocate for the awareness of the life-threatening illness, Tigger stated, “More people are living with HIV and AIDS today than ever before. It saddens me to know that, in the United States, the most powerful country in the world, the HIV infection rates are as bad if not worse than in third world countries.” Continuing, he said “We need to educate everyone about the HIV virus and get as many people tested as we can because most HIV infections are transmitted by people who don’t know their status.”
“Do yourself a favor; come out and have a good time. Learn some stuff, get tested, know your status.” This is in reference to his Annual HIV/AIDS Awareness Event.

Hip-Hop Awareness
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS. The virus attacks the immune system and leaves the body vulnerable to a variety of life-threatening infections and cancers. AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is the final stage of HIV disease, which causes severe damage to the immune system.

Important facts about the spread of AIDS include:

  • AIDS is the sixth leading cause of death among people ages 25 – 44 in the United States, down from number one in 1995.
  • The World Health Organization estimates that more than 25 million people worldwide have died from this infection since the start of the epidemic.
  • In 2008, there were approximately 33.4 million people around the world living with HIV/AIDS, including 2.1 million children under age 15.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS. The virus attacks the immune system and leaves the body vulnerable to a variety of life-threatening infections and cancers.

Common bacteria, yeast, parasites, and viruses that usually do not cause serious disease in people with healthy immune systems can cause fatal illnesses in people with AIDS.

HIV has been found in saliva, tears, nervous system tissue and spinal fluid, blood, semen (including pre-seminal fluid, which is the liquid that comes out before ejaculation), vaginal fluid, and breast milk. However, only blood, semen, vaginal secretions, and breast milk have been shown to transmit infection to others.

The virus can be spread (transmitted):

  • Through sexual contact — including oral, vaginal, and anal sex
  • Through blood — via blood transfusions (now extremely rare in the U.S.) or needle sharing
  • From mother to child — a pregnant woman can transmit the virus to her fetus through their shared blood circulation, or a nursing mother can transmit it to her baby in her breast milk

Other methods of spreading the virus are rare and include accidental needle injury, artificial insemination with infected donated semen, and organ transplantation with infected organs.

HIV infection is NOT spread by:

  • Casual contact such as hugging
  • Mosquitoes
  • Participation in sports
  • Touching items that were touched by a person infected with the virus

AIDS and blood or organ donation:

  • AIDS is NOT transmitted to a person who DONATES blood or organs. People who donate organs are never in direct contact with people who receive them. Likewise, a person who donates blood is never in contact with the person receiving it. In all these procedures, sterile needles and instruments are used.
  • However, HIV can be transmitted to a person RECEIVING blood or organs from an infected donor. To reduce this risk, blood banks and organ donor programs screen donors, blood, and tissues thoroughly.

People at highest risk for getting HIV include:

  • Injection drug users who share needles
  • Infants born to mothers with HIV who didn’t receive HIV therapy during pregnancy
  • People engaging in unprotected sex, especially with people who have other high-risk behaviors, are HIV-positive, or have AIDS
  • People who received blood transfusions or clotting products between 1977 and 1985 (before screening for the virus became standard practice)
  • Sexual partners of those who participate in high-risk activities (such as injection drug use or anal sex)People with AIDS have had their immune system damaged by HIV and are very susceptible to these opportunistic infections. Common symptoms are:
    • Chills
    • Fever
    • Sweats (particularly at night)
    • Swollen lymph glands
    • Weakness
    • Weight lossThere is no cure for AIDS at this time. However, a variety of treatments are available that can help keep symptoms at bay and improve the quality of life for those who have already developed symptoms.

Hip-Hop Health- Trick Daddy(Lupus)

Back in 2009, The Miami-bred rapper appeared on The Rickey Smiley Morning Show today (March 23) to promote his autobiography Magic City: Trials of a Native Son. During the interview, he made the shocking revelation that he suffers from Lupus, an incurable autoimmune disease, which makes the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue.

Hip-Hop Awareness

Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years. In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs (“foreign invaders,” like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues (“auto” means “self”) and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.

No gene or group of genes has been proven to cause lupus. Lupus does, however, appear in certain families, and when one of two identical twins has lupus, there is an increased chance that the other twin will also develop the disease. These findings, as well as others, strongly suggest that genes are involved in the development of lupus. Although lupus can develop in people with no family history of lupus, there are likely to be other autoimmune diseases in some family members. Certain ethnic groups (people of African, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Island descent) have a greater risk of developing lupus, which may be related to genes they have in common.

Hip-Hop Health- Shawty Lo (Diabetes)

Shawty Lo revealed that he’s been struggling with diabetes for 11 years. “I’m diabetic. I’ve been diabetic for 11 years now, and first I was in denial when I first became a diabetic because I wanted to stay the same. But when you learn how to cope with it, you deal with it. I’m trying to teach people who have the disease that you can live with it.”  Shawty Lo has participated in the American Diabetes step out and Walk for past two years.

http://stepout.diabetes.org/site/PageServer?pagename=OUT_homepage

 

Hip-Hop Awareness

Diabetes is a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there are high levels of sugar in the blood. 

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to control blood sugar. Diabetes can be caused by too little insulin, resistance to insulin, or both.

To understand diabetes, it is important to first understand the normal process by which food is broken down and used by the body for energy. Several things happen when food is digested:

  • A sugar called glucose enters the bloodstream. Glucose is a source of fuel for the body.
  • An organ called the pancreas makes insulin. The role of insulin is to move glucose from the bloodstream into muscle, fat, and liver cells, where it can be used as fuel.

People with diabetes have high blood sugar because their body cannot move sugar into fat, liver, and muscle cells to be stored for energy. This is because either:

  • Their pancreas does not make enough insulin
  • Their cells do not respond to insulin normally
  • Both of the above

There are three major types of diabetes. The causes and risk factors are different for each type:

  • Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it is most often diagnosed in children, teens, or young adults. In this disease, the body makes little or no insulin. Daily injections of insulin are needed. The exact cause is unknown.
  • Type 2 diabetes makes up most of diabetes cases. It most often occurs in adulthood, but teens and young adults are now being diagnosed with it because of high obesity rates. Many people with type 2 diabetes do not know they have it.
  • Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops at any time during pregnancy in a woman who does not have diabetes.

Diabetes affects more than 20 million Americans. Over 40 million Americans have pre-diabetes (early type 2 diabetes).

For more check out the video below

 

Hip-Hop Health- Nelly’s Sister Jackie (Leukemia)

Nelly’s Sister, Jackie Donahue, 31, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia in March 2001. The cancer was in remission for nearly two years before she suffered a relapse in 2003, after which Nelly (born Cornell Haynes Jr.) formed the Jes Us 4 Jackie campaign to find a bone marrow donor for his sister and to raise donation awareness. 

Hip-Hop Awareness

Leukemia is a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These deranged, immature cells accumulate in the blood and within organs of the body. They are not able to carry out the normal functions of blood cells.

Normal blood contains 3 major groups of cells: white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. All 3 types of blood cells develop from one immature cell type, called blood/marrow stem cells, in a process called hematopoiesis.

Symptoms usually develop fairly quickly in acute leukemias. Most cases of acute leukemia are diagnosed when the person visits his or her healthcare provider after becoming ill. Symptoms develop gradually in chronic leukemias and are generally not as severe as in acute leukemias. About 20% of people withchronic leukemia do not have symptoms at the time their disease is diagnosed.

Some symptoms of leukemia are due to deficiencies of normal blood cells. Others are due to collections of leukemia cells in tissues and organs. Leukemia cells can collect in many different parts of the body, such as thetesticles, brain, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, digestive tract, kidneys, lungs, eyes, and skin — in effect, virtually every tissue site.

For More on Leukemia, check out the video below!

YOUR SHOPPING CART

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